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University of New Brunswick and Cisco sign IT innovation and R&D pact

The University of New Brunswick (UNB) and Cisco Canada this week announced two agreements aimed at helping the university become a world leader in technology innovation.


October 26, 2011  


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The University of New Brunswick (UNB) and Cisco Canada this week announced two agreements aimed at helping the university become a world leader in technology innovation.

The agreements were signed at a meeting of the Premier’s Advisory Council on Technology in Toronto by Eddy Campbell, UNB president, and Nitin Kawale, president of Cisco Canada.

“Effective partnerships are critical to the production of research and to the support of development activities,” said Campbell. “Collaborations, such as this enhance the reputation of UNB programs and drive the continued success of our students.”

As part of the agreement, Cisco is providing a $2 million endowment to establish a Cisco Chair in Advanced Learning Technologies, which “will promote, support, and lead innovation at the university through industry-linked projects.”

The two parties also signed a marketing development agreement they say will help UNB engineering students collaborate to develop energy-efficient processes for the manufacturing industry.

“The Green Remote Automation and Monitoring for Manufacturing (GRAMM) project will develop the physical monitoring, computing and network infrastructure to remotely monitor manufacturing and production processes, store and manage information, and develop analytical tools so that manufacturing processes and entire facilities can be remotely powered up or down in accordance with production or power demands,” they said in a release.

Ultimately, companies will be able to reduce power consumption while improving production rates, process performance, quality, and employee communication.

Graduate students taking part in the GRAMM project will be able to take courses and interact with professors using Cisco TelePresence, irrespective of where they are located.

Cisco will also provide UNB with two Cisco TelePresence 500 Systems, one on UNB’s Fredericton campus and another at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., as well as an hardware and software to help drive the GRAMM project.

Cisco’s hardware and cash contribution under the marketing development agreement is an estimated $350,000.

The project will also use the CANARIE Network, which connects nearly 40,000 researchers at 200 Canadian universities and colleges to share and analyze data.