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Trend Micro calls 2011 “Year of Data Breaches”

Trend Micro, in its annual threat round-up report, tags 2011 as "The Year of Data Breaches," after "witnessing large, well-known companies succumb to targeted data breach attacks that not only stained reputations, but caused significant...


January 18, 2012  


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Trend Micro, in its annual threat round-up report, tags 2011 as “The Year of Data Breaches,” after “witnessing large, well-known companies succumb to targeted data breach attacks that not only stained reputations, but caused significant collateral damage.”

Authored by Trend Micro threat researchers, the report revisits past predictions, and summarizes “notable threat incidents and security wins” throughout 2011.

Below, is how the company described how the year unfolded:

* Mobile Threats Reached New Levels: Trend Micro threat researchers tracked a staggering spike in the volume of mobile malware, especially those targeting the Android platform.

* Spammers Gained: 2011 was a profitable year for social media threats, spammers and scammers who leveraged the trending topics of social networking sites to improve upon their social engineering and hacking tactics, stealing the data of millions of social networkers worldwide. Consequently, regulators have started demanding that social networking sites implement policies and mechanisms to protect the privacy of their users.

* Less Attacks, More Vulnerability: while the number of publicly reported vulnerabilities decreased from 4,651 in 2010 to 4,155 in 2011, exploit attacks evolved with higher complexity and sophistication. Exploit attacks in 2011 were targeted, original, and well controlled.

“With 3.5 new threats created every second, and as businesses and consumers take the journey to the cloud, the risk of data and financial loss are greater than ever,” said Raimund Genes, chief technology officer at Trend Micro. “As a company (and as an industry), we must continue to evolve and create better, data-centric security products for the post-PC era. Users need greater visibility and assurance into who is accessing their data, when, where and how.”