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Telus/Rotman IT security study reveals breaches increased by 29%

Telus Communications Inc. and the Rotman School of Management have released their third annual study on Canadian IT security and it reveals that Canadian companies experienced a 29% increase in security breaches from 2009 to 2010.


November 9, 2010  


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Telus Communications Inc. and the Rotman School of Management have released their third annual study on Canadian IT security and it reveals that Canadian companies experienced a 29% increase in security breaches from 2009 to 2010.

 

The study also found that the annual cost of these security breaches dropped considerably from $834,000 to $179,508 during the same one-year period.

 

According to the survey, government entities are experiencing twice the number of breaches than companies in the private sector, with an almost 74% increase in one year.

 

“The increase can be explained by a significant investment in detection and response capabilities, which enable greater visibility into breaches and lower associated costs,” the two organizations said in a release.

 

“In addition, the study reveals a growing trend toward sophisticated attacks focused on customer and citizen data. Research from Telus Security Labs indicates that attackers are seeking out sensitive data that can be sold or repurposed for financial gain.”

 

Additionally, this year’s study finds one in four Canadian organizations are blocking access to social networking sites, citing security as the primary driver.

 

However, in both the private and public sectors, organizations that block these sites experienced no improvement in security and could suffer a worsening of security as employees attempt to circumvent the block. 

 

“We see a need to maintain control in an ever-changing threat environment, where attacks are designed to penetrate security using the latest technologies and processes,” said Dr. Walid Hejazi, Professor of Business Economics, Rotman School of Management.

 

“However, our research indicates that the adoption of social networking in the workplace is simply not a contributing factor to breach increases. The best course of action is to instill a sense of trust and educate employees on how to engage in social networking appropriately.”