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Telus-Rotman IT security study finds hacks increasingly sophisticated

 One-in-three IT security attacks seek financial gain, according to Telus and the Rotman School of Management's fourth annual study on Canadian IT security, released on Tuesday.


November 16, 2011  


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 One-in-three IT security attacks seek financial gain, according to Telus and the Rotman School of Management’s fourth annual study on Canadian IT security, released on Tuesday.

The study surveyed more than 600 Canadian IT professionals across government, public and private sectors.

“After four years of study, we are noticing an alarming trend toward attacks that are becoming more targeted, focusing on specific individuals and their data for financial gain,” said Yogen Appalraju, vice president, Telus Security Solutions. “These attacks are also reported less frequently, as they are much harder to detect and ultimately pose even greater risks. Organizations need to make continued, proactive investment in security to manage how breaches are evolving and the impact that they can have.”

The 2011 study reveals some positive results, with overall threats down nearly 50% from last year, to an average of 7.6 breaches per year compared to 14.6 in 2010. This is the first year the study has seen the trend toward rising breach numbers reverse since the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis.

The top three breaches reported in 2011 include:

* Viruses and malware (46%)

* Laptop or mobile hardware device theft (22%)

* Phishing/Pharming (20%)

This year’s report also indicates that increased complexity of IT environments is a top concern of senior management because complexity hinders a security team’s ability to manage risk effectively. The increased complexity stems in part from the emergence of new technologies including mobile computing in the workplace.