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Ovum finds BYOD adoption faster in high-growth markets than mature markets

Employees in high-growth markets are more willing to embrace the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) phenomenon and the personal productivity benefits of enterprise mobility compared to those in mature markets, research firm Ovum has found. Driving...


November 29, 2012  


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Employees in high-growth markets are more willing to embrace the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) phenomenon and the personal productivity benefits of enterprise mobility compared to those in mature markets, research firm Ovum has found. Driving this trend is the predisposition of professionals in high-growth markets to “live to work” and the lower rate of corporate provision of mobile handsets and tablets.

A new position paper from Ovum reveals that across 17 markets, 57.1% of full-time employees engage in some form of BYOD.

“Employees in high-growth, emerging economies are demonstrating a more flexible attitude to working hours, and are happy to use their own devices for work. However, in mature markets, employees have settled into comfortable patterns of working behaviour and are more precious about the separation of their work and personal domains,” said Richard Absalom, consumer impact IT analyst at Ovum. “This bifurcation in behaviour will shape not just future patterns of enterprise mobility in high-growth markets compared to mature markets, but also dictate which markets, structurally, are going to benefit most from this revolution in how and where we work.”

Ovum’s research also suggests that employees in high-growth markets see BYOD as way to get ahead in their careers, with 79% believing that constant connectivity to work applications enables them to do their jobs better, compared to 53.5% in mature markets.

A notable anomaly to this trend is Spain, where 62.8% of employees bring their own devices to work – well above the developed market mean. “This could have something to do with the struggling economy: people are willing to use any and all means necessary to get ahead in their jobs, as losing them could be disastrous, given the high rates of unemployment,” suggests Absalom.