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Multimedia voice response system automates service functions

Avaya Inc. today introduced Interactive Response, a multimedia voice response system that it says enables companies...


February 11, 2003  


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Avaya Inc. today introduced Interactive Response, a multimedia voice response system that it says enables companies to save money and serve customers better by automating service functions.

Supporting touch-tone and speech-enabled access to information in company databases and business applications, the system can be adapted to accommodate almost any interaction a human service representative could perform by telephone.

The software ships pre-configured on a standard Sun Blade150 workstation from Sun Microsystems Inc.

It comes equipped with 0/100 Ethernet connectivity, enabling streamlined and cost-effective deployment in converged voice and data networks. The open standards-based system supports end-to-end IP telephony through connection to Avaya MultiVantage software and communications servers.

IP networking enables companies to implement applications more flexibly and cost-effectively across multiple sites and multiple communications channels, such as voice, email and web.

“The trend is clear, customers want to communicate with contact centers via the media of their choice,” said Dick Bucci, senior research analyst, Frost & Sullivan. “Contact center managers want software-centric solutions like Avaya Interactive Response that accommodate not just today’s needs but the rapidly evolving world of communications built around IP. By 2007, we expect that 35-40 per cent of global communications traffic will be routed over the Internet with contact centers accounting for a large portion of that growth.”

Companies often use self-service systems to handle repetitive calls, such as requests for directions, hours of operation and order confirmation.

Implementing self-service can cut service costs to pennies per transaction while raising employee job satisfaction because less time is spent responding to routine questions, Avaya says.


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