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Hiring trends for IT professionals expected to grow in 2011 (November 24, 2010)

IT projects related to collaboration, security and cloud computing are driving job prospects for Canadian technology  professionals, according to a recent survey of Canadian business decision makers commissioned by IT staffing firm...


November 24, 2010  


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IT projects related to collaboration, security and cloud computing are driving job prospects for Canadian technology  professionals, according to a recent survey of Canadian business decision makers commissioned by IT staffing firm Sapphire Canada and IBM Canada Ltd. 

Almost half of the survey respondents now foresee an increased need for IT personnel in the near and long-term, much more favourable than in 2009. In addition, almost 50% of those surveyed plan to grow their current staffing levels this quarter, while only 7% expect to decrease.

“The results from the survey show employers are investing more in their workforce and are slowly taking off their ‘recession blinders’,” said Sergio Mateus, president of Sapphire.

“Our outlook is very positive for those looking for work in the IT sector. IT has traditionally been one of the first industries to bounce back after a recession, and these results suggest demand for IT professionals is on the rise again.”

In 2011, 95% of respondents plan to either maintain or increase current staffing levels,  with the vast majority of these resources needed for projects related to collaboration (44%), security (25%) and cloud computing (18%).

“As the technologies converge, skills in collaboration, security and cloud are much in demand. Companies want to be on the cloud for the benefits but need to develop their strategy and understand the impact on their overall skills and resourcing,” said Bob Wylie, vice president of Datacentre, Workplace and Enterprise Services at IBM.

“Finding skilled IT people for emerging technologies can be challenging and companies should be prepared to look at creative approaches to filling the gap.”

Further information on the survey will appear in the Jan./Feb. 2011 print edition of CNS.