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Heavy Reading: SDPs are confusing telcos

Service delivery platforms (SDPs) continue to gain market traction as a way for telecom network operators to delive...


November 3, 2005  


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Service delivery platforms (SDPs) continue to gain market traction as a way for telecom network operators to deliver new services quickly and inexpensively, but SDP suppliers need to do a much better job of explaining what their products do and how they fit into the overall carrier service delivery environment, according to a new report issued by Heavy Reading, Light Reading Inc.’s market research division.

The Future of SDP delivers a technology and market analysis of the SDP sector, including a comprehensive taxonomy describing the components that make up an SDP and how those elements are combined into the different types of products that need to be integrated to populate an SDP framework.

The 75-page report contains detailed product and strategic analyses for 24 different SDP vendors, including market leaders Alcatel, Ericsson, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Microsoft and Siemens.

The Future of SDP highlights each vendor’s interpretation of what constitutes an SDP, where its products sit in the Heavy Reading SDP taxonomy, its individual market strategies, and its future development roadmap.

The report also identifies important industry trends that are likely to shape the SDP landscape over the next few years.

“SDP product vendors are not doing a good job of explaining what they do and where they fit to the market, a weakness that threatens to hamper SDP market development,” notes Caroline Chappell, Analyst at Large with Heavy Reading and author of the report.

“Operators may stay with their stovepipe service delivery approach because it seems simpler than trying to understand vendors’ very different — and often contradictory — architectural approaches. Or they will buy from the names they’ve heard of, rather than exploring best-of-breed products whose descriptions they don’t understand.”

Further information on the report is available at www.heavyreading.com.