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Fiber in the Arctic network moves step closer to reality

Toronto-based Arctic Fibre has completed the identification of seven cable-landing points across Nunavut as part of its 15,700 kilometre subsea fiber-optic network through the Northwest Passage between London, England and Tokyo, Japan. The...


August 29, 2013  


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Toronto-based Arctic Fibre has completed the identification of seven cable-landing points across Nunavut as part of its 15,700 kilometre subsea fiber-optic network through the Northwest Passage between London, England and Tokyo, Japan. The Arctic Fibre project also enables the construction of a local broadband network that can serve 52% of Nunavut’s population living in communities adjacent to the backbone network.

During the past week, a seven-person team that included Arctic Fibre staff, environmental consultants, civil works contractor and network design engineer travelled 6,675 kilometres to visit the communities of Iqaluit, Cape Dorset, Hall Beach, Igloolik, Taloyoak, Gjoa Haven and Cambridge Bay.

Information sessions and consultations were well attended, the firm said, with representatives of the federal and territorial governments, hamlet councils, Hunters and Trappers Associations, Community Land and Resource Committees, Kitikmeot Inuit Association, Qikiqtani Inuit Association, local businesses, telecommunications carriers and local residents.

“In most instances, we were able to confirm the engineering studies undertaken over the past two years,” said Douglas Cunningham, CEO of Arctic Fibre. “However, we obtained input and local knowledge from residents that led us to modify our landing locations in Cape Dorset, Igloolik and Taloyoak to spots better suited to avoid ice scour, wave action and not interfere with local activities.”