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Roof Rights

One of the smaller, yet frustrating, obstacles that fixed-wireless operators face is gaining the rights to access the roofs of commercial buildings to install antennas. Companies like Stream Intellige...


February 1, 2001  


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One of the smaller, yet frustrating, obstacles that fixed-wireless operators face is gaining the rights to access the roofs of commercial buildings to install antennas. Companies like Stream Intelligent Networks Corp. of Toronto, have to negotiate a fee with a building’s owners to erect units that are between 12- and 24-inches in diameter.

“The tough sell is explaining to the landlord that what they want to charge has to bear a relationship to the kind of revenues we expect to generate,” says Steve Spooner, company president and CEO. He says the landlords set the price, and wireless operators have to decide whether it’s worth paying it.

As for aesthetics, one of the advantages of aerials is that they are far smaller than the 10-foot-diameter dishes common to cellular-phone operators — removing at least the criticism that the antennas are unsightly.


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