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Report shows “Bandwidth Gap”

Contrary to popular belief, we may not be experiencing a "bandwidth glut" after all. A recent report by The Phillips Group, a London, UK-based communications consultancy, has revealed just the opposit...


May 1, 2001  


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Contrary to popular belief, we may not be experiencing a “bandwidth glut” after all. A recent report by The Phillips Group, a London, UK-based communications consultancy, has revealed just the opposite: that a global bandwidth “gap” actually prevails.

The report, called The Bandwidth Gap, reveals that this gap will restrict more than 87 per cent of the potential offered load from global access networks at the end of 2001. Created and perpetuated by the technology deployed in the access network environment, the report forecasts that the bandwidth gap will persist beyond 2015 if current approaches to technology are maintained.

The report advocates a radical approach to global network topology to close the gap and to provision sufficient core capacity to support the topological load that will ensue.

“Unlocking the bandwidth gap at the access network will unleash topological load in the core of the network that far outweighs the offered load generated by network users,” says David Prior, practice director of e-services and Infrastructure at The Phillips Group and the report’s author. “The Bandwidth Gap is about the future of the bandwidth business.”

The report argues that the deployment of multiple dynamic sessions in the core of the network will continue to increase the load, and suggests that traditional infrastructures need to be replaced.

An answer to the dilemma, according to the study, lies in a combination of advanced optical environments, new network mechanisms, and a model derived from the principles of customer-empowered networks.

For further information on The Bandwidth Gap report please email thegap@the-phillips-group.com.


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