Connections +
Feature

Letters: It Should Have Been Toxic, Not Toxin

I would like to thank you for the feature article in Cabling Networking Systems on the health and safety of abandoned cable (see July/August 2004). Until I read the article I had no idea of the seriousness of the situation.


November 1, 2004  


Print this page

I would like to thank you for the feature article in Cabling Networking Systems on the health and safety of abandoned cable (see July/August 2004). Until I read the article I had no idea of the seriousness of the situation.

One correction I would like to point out, however, is the use of the word “toxin.” By definition, a toxin is a poisonous substance produced by an organism or living cells. For example, snake venom is a toxin.

Mercury and lead are not toxins, but are certainly poisonous and have toxic effects.

Carcinogenic chemicals mentioned in the article, such as perflouroctanoic acid, should be described with the more encompassing term “poisons”, or at the very least, “toxic materials”.

It is a minor issue given the audience of the magazine, but if the readers were biologists or medical specialists, it would be rather embarrassing.

David Elfstrom, P.Eng

Systems Engineer, Research Computing

Sunnybrook & Women’s College Health Sciences Centre

Toronto, Ont.

CNS November/December 2004 www.cnsmagazine.com