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Integrated Research survey pumps up the power of VoIP

IP telephony is steadily replacing legacy PSTN systems in medium-to-large companies, but the split between the two is still fairly even. Call quality, management, and applications that merge voice and...


January 1, 2004  


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IP telephony is steadily replacing legacy PSTN systems in medium-to-large companies, but the split between the two is still fairly even. Call quality, management, and applications that merge voice and data are also important factors in migrating from a legacy system.

These are just some of the findings of a recent global survey conducted by Integrated Research Ltd., an Australian network management software developer

The survey polled over 2,800 senior IT and telecoms managers, evenly distributed across medium to large enterprises. Approximately 80% of respondents were from North America, with the remainder distributed evenly between Europe and Asia.

Graham Jones, IR’s director of IP telephony products, says that call quality is the key challenge in convincing companies to switch from their old analogue and digital systems to IP handsets.

“End users are accustomed to PSTN quality and will not settle for less, even with added functionality,” says Jones. “For an end user, picking up a phone implies getting an instant dial tone, and continued cutoffs or audio quality problems will have users running back to their old phones.”

The survey suggests that most organizations are moving to IP telephony. With 56% of respondents already using an IP telephony system, 26% indicated a trial within 12 months, with a further 18% pointing to a two-year trial date.

Key external factors driving IP telephony sales in the next two years appear to be stronger IT spending (strengthening economy), and a perception that IP telephony has come of age (and is now a lower risk), the company says.

The survey responses indicated the highest priority business driver for IP telephony is increased value through IP applications (66% response), followed by lower infrastructure costs (64%) and open standards (50%).


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