Connections +
Feature

Huge growth predicted for wireless users

The number of wireless device users with access to inbound and outbound information services and Internet messaging will increase dramatically over the next few years, according to a recent report fro...


March 1, 2000  


Print this page

The number of wireless device users with access to inbound and outbound information services and Internet messaging will increase dramatically over the next few years, according to a recent report from IDC of Framingham, MA.

The report, Wireless Access to the Internet, 1999: Everybody’s Doin’ It, projects the number of users will grow from 7.4 million in 1999 to 61.5 million by 2003 in the U.S. alone.

“It is easy to envision a time in the next few years when the majority of Internet access could be through wireless and not wired means,” said Iain Gillott, VP of Worldwide Consumer and Small Business Telecommunications research at IDC. “The irony is that many users will not know they are using the Internet over their wireless devices — they will simply see, as some do today, updates from CNN, CNBC, Reuters, and so on and take that fact for granted. The underlying infrastructure that makes this possible is invisible to them.”

Despite the expected increase in the number of users accessing the Internet with wireless devices, IDC believes users’ lack of understanding is thwarting interest. “Some cellular/PCS users believe access to the Internet means browsing and displaying full web pages on the handset display,” said Gillott. “This incorrect perception will have to change, and will change, as more services are offered and the awareness of actual wireless Internet capabilities increases.”

According to IDC, two major occurrences pushed the wireless Internet market forward in 1999: Microsoft’s involvement with the Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) Forum and the introduction of mobile-specific portals. WAP is a specification that provides easy, secure access to relevant Internet/Intranet information and other services through mobile devices in a cost-effective manner.

Currently, the portals’ involvement with wireless carriers is a market differentiator, but IDC says that as the contracts are nonexclusive, carriers will soon have to find another way to differentiate themselves.


Print this page

Related