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Editorial (November 01, 2002)

Terry Mosey, the president of Bell Ontario, deserves credit for attempting to generate some much-needed debate and discussion on how best to revitalize a structured cabling industry that like most of ...


November 1, 2002  


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Terry Mosey, the president of Bell Ontario, deserves credit for attempting to generate some much-needed debate and discussion on how best to revitalize a structured cabling industry that like most of the high-tech sector, remains stuck in an economic slump.

How bad is it? Last month, KMI Research, a Providence, R.I. optical networking intelligence consulting firm, held what it called a “Survivors Forum” designed to keep telecommunications executives, financial analysts, component suppliers and fireberoptic cable vendors “in the know during these turbulent times.” Conference chairman Richard Mack said that after 18 months of negative market growth, it’s more important than ever to offer perspectives on different product families and different applications areas to address questions concerning this market’s recovery.

That this market will and must improve was the theme of Mosey’s keynote speech (see p. 6) at the BICSI Canadian Regional Conference in Quebec City held in mid-September.

“The message is one of renewal,” he said. “Certainly, on the most basic level it’s about the renewal of cable and infrastructure in countless buildings around the globe, but in essence the real renewal is more far reaching than just designing and selling cable installations.

“International recognition has now established BICSI as part of the bedrock on which our industry has been built. And because of that kind of solid foundation, the Internet is about to transform itself from an exciting, but makeshift storefront into a strong, resilient and very profitable home for business.” It’s no longer just about cabling.”

In order to precipitate any type of recovery, the organizations that buy and install structured cabling need to stop curtailing projects and start thinking seriously about the innovation factor. The economic malaise permeating through this and other industries should be viewed as a temporary setback – no less and no more – that will sooner, rather than later, eventually correct itself.

Otherwise, what would the point be of introducing new advances such OTDRs that meet the rigorous test demands of gigabit, 10 gigabit and higher speed applications (p. 7), Category 6 (cover story), wireless initiatives in the classroom ( p. 20) or a multitude of potential breakthroughs that are currently in progress at R&D facilities around the world?

As the new editor of Cabling Systems, I have set two goals. The first is to maintain the quality set by my predecessor by delivering timely news, insight, technical analysis and commentary. The second is to open up the communications channel with readers.

In terms of content, I’m fortunate to have inherited an excellent group of editorial advisory board members, none of whom wear rose-coloured glasses. To that end, we’re currently in the process of creating a 2003 feature schedule that reflects the realities of today’s economy, yet doesn’t ignore the advances that make this industry so exciting.

I can be reached at (416) 442-2124 or by e-mail at pbarker@cablingsystems.com.


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