Connections +
Feature

Editorial (November 01, 2003)

This issue marks the end of an era for Cabling Systems, a magazine that made its debut five years ago as the new Canadian voice for the structured cabling and telecommunications industry.A new era wil...


November 1, 2003  


Print this page

This issue marks the end of an era for Cabling Systems, a magazine that made its debut five years ago as the new Canadian voice for the structured cabling and telecommunications industry.

A new era will begin in January with the arrival of CNS, an acronym for Cabling Networking Systems. As the name suggests, a key new coverage area – the active network – is being added at the same the industry is on the threshold of major change and expansion.

We are certainly not walking away from the original mandate, but expanding it.

Apart from introducing a new name and logo, David Young, the magazine’s art director is currently working on a major redesign, which will be introduced in the first issue of 2004.

The timing is right. In the View From The Board column on p. 23, Brad Masterson concludes that networks represent the next logical evolution.

What that means for cable installers in particular is that they need to look for new opportunities on the networking and connectivity side of the equation.

Why the need to change business models? “Simply put, the cabling world is going through long-term changes, ” Masterson writes. “Astute business people realize that they have to adapt accordingly if they want to survive.

“The people and skill sets required to manage networks are also changing, making enterprises increasingly dependent on suppliers to do the work for them. Today’s networks require a new type of expert that has in-depth knowledge of standards, protocols, testing procedures and installation requirements.”

It’s called diversification and it is necessary because the structured cabling industry of today is far different than it was in 1998.

All this change comes at a good time. In our cover story beginning on p. 8, Joaquim Menezes concludes that the light seems to be breaking through again after the bleak networking climate of the past couple of years.

And while there are signs of a resurgence underway, the slump will definitely be over when organizations start spending again. That is expected to happen within the next 12 months.

According to Frank Murawski, president of FTM Consulting Inc., three major trends emerge: A rise in strategic spending, renewed interest in fiber to the desk and the rapidly growing importance of Voice over IP.

He points out that during the slump, businesses would install new LAN networks only for applications that promised immediate payback or productivity increases. Installing LANs for connectivity purposes was not considered a prudent investment.

In order to gain a competitive advantage, he suggests that larger companies will soon opt for such up-and-coming technologies as HDTV over IP and tele-immersion, an application that combines teleconferencing and virtual reality.

With these and other advances coming our way, the time is right to introduce a new addition into the pages of this magazine. Watch for it in January.