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‘Disconnect’ threatens to stunt business growth: CA Canada

A diagnosis of Canadian enterprises has found that many business managers overlook the role information technologies can play in reducing costs, improving service and, ultimately, supporting business ...


November 1, 2008  


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A diagnosis of Canadian enterprises has found that many business managers overlook the role information technologies can play in reducing costs, improving service and, ultimately, supporting business objectives.

The national survey by enterprise software company CA Canada found that while business and technology managers are relatively well aligned in their priorities, a lack of understanding between the groups has resulted in a disconnect that affects the overall health of the enterprise.

According to the 2008 CA Canada Business Service Management (BSM) Survey, both business and technology managers agree that the top IT priorities for the organization during the next 12 months are aligning IT with business priorities; controlling IT costs and improving service to end users.

The survey found that business managers consistently ranked IT’s effectiveness lower — sometimes by nearly half — than technology managers did in a number of areas, including:

• 60% of technology managers feel their IT organization is effective or very effective in aligning IT with business priorities; only 39% of business managers agree.

• 56% of technology managers believe their IT organization is effective or very effective at controlling IT costs; only 30% of business managers agree.

• 62% of technology managers rate their IT organizations as effective or very effective at improving service to end-users; only 38% of business managers agree.

“The survey results indicate that some Canadian organizations are showing symptoms of a ‘disconnect disorder’ that can threaten the health of the enterprise,” says Renee Lalonde, regional vice president, CA Canada. “The business side may not fully understand what IT does and how it can help meet strategic objectives. And IT isn’t always as effective as it could be in communicating how its solutions can drive business results.”