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Datacomm building cabling market on verge of a revival

After sputtering for the past several years, the datacomm building cabling market is projected to revive over the n...


December 15, 2003  


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After sputtering for the past several years, the datacomm building cabling market is projected to revive over the next five years, according to a new report.

Frank Murawski, president of FTM Consulting Inc., indicated that the firm’s recent research points to a market renewal, which will be driven by fiber cabling.

"For the past three years, the cabling market has been in a severe downturn caused by the economic slowdown restricting capital expenditures for local area networks (LANs), in conjunction with cabling market saturation," he said.

"Copper cabling, the mainstay of the marketplace, grew at phenomenal rates in the 1990’s, as the initial LANs, using Cat 5 copper cabling, were installed in the larger enterprises. By 1999, most of these large networks were already in place, leading to the onset of market saturation for the cabling market. Now, with the economy rebounding, capital expenditures for networks are expected to resume."

However, he said that double-digit growth in fiber cabling will not occur until 2005, as pent up demand for newer fiber cabling systems arrives.

A combination of requirements for bottleneck relief at critical network points, such as Storage Area Networks (SANs); adoption of new broadband applications; and, the availability of economic new fiber technologies, such as VCSELs and laser-enhanced multimode fibers, will all come together in 2005, said Murawski.

The study concludes that the two largest cabling applications for fiber will be campus and SANs. FTTD is also forecast to have high growth, but is expected to be a much smaller market than the other two high-growth applications. Riser cabling is projected to continue to be the largest fiber cabling application over the forecast period.

Further information is available at www.ftmconsultinginc.com.