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Canadian SMB data remains vulnerable to attack, natural disaster: Primus

Small and medium business owners are leaving themselves increasingly vulnerable to the loss of data and the potential for a privacy breach despite a series of high-profile incidents in which confidential information on company servers have been...


February 29, 2012  


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Small and medium business owners are leaving themselves increasingly vulnerable to the loss of data and the potential for a privacy breach despite a series of high-profile incidents in which confidential information on company servers have been compromised.

The findings come from a recent survey commissioned by Primus Business Services, a PTGi company, which shows nearly two-thirds (60%) of participating small and medium businesses in Canada invest less than 10% of their budgets in data security despite the fact that a comparable percentage agree that they are concerned with the security and integrity of their business data.

In addition, Canada’s SMB owners and IT decision makers polled remain confused about the benefits and security of cloud computing, misperceiving it as less secure than maintaining servers in their own offices.

Half of respondents reported being concerned with the security of hosting in the cloud.

AJ Byers, executive vice president of Primus Business Services, said that while IT decision makers continue to question cloud computing due to concerns of lack of control and misperceptions related to data security, the reality of cloud computing is that it offers greater protection than what most companies are deploying in their offices today.

The study found the overwhelming majority of businesses polled are not hosting their data in the cloud as just over 1 in 10(14%) use the technology.

Surprisingly, more than half of businesses polled have not invested in the most advanced security solutions and two-thirds (63%) have not worked with an IT security firm to audit their security practices. 

“This seems alarming as the study’s findings come after years of privacy breaches at a number of high-profile organizations in the retail, financial services and public service sectors,” Primus noted.

Despite misconceptions about cloud computing for business, there is a unanimous and growing need for robust data protection, particularly in an environment of extreme natural occurrences and nefarious hacking breaches, Primus said. 

“Cloud computing is still a relative enigma, but its inherent security, cost and most importantly, time management benefits, will imminently bring it into the mainstream of Canadian business,” says Matt Stein, senior vice president of network, technology and planning at Primus Canada. “However, it is critical that business decision makers look for providers that offer enterprise quality operational, management and security procedures in a truly scalable model.”