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CABA study finds consumer awareness about smart grids lacking

The Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA) has completed a collaborative research study that examined the impact of smart grids on connected homes.


November 14, 2012  


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The Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA) has completed a collaborative research study that examined the impact of smart grids on connected homes.

According to CABA, the study found that the concept of a connected home is desirable for consumers due to the perceived benefits of controllability, energy savings and security that homeowners derive from it. 

However, it also found lack of awareness, confusion regarding what products and services are best suited for consumers, and quantification of the cost benefit analysis are the key issues that have kept the industry from moving forward.

Overall, the study found that only 39% of consumers had some level of understanding of the smart grid. Only 34% of consumers, who have general smart grid awareness, attribute this awareness to their local utility company, and marketing campaigns concerning smart and green home technologies.

The study found that energy efficiency would continue to dominate the discussions around adopting smart technologies by homeowners into the near future. The ability to quantify energy savings and reduce operation expenses will increase demand for connected home products and services. 

The report also found that while pure-play entrants, such as manufacturers and solution providers would participate in the market, more sole solutions from utilities teaming with telecom firms could be expected in the long run.

 “CABA was pleased that a number of world-class companies and organizations came together to support this project,” stated Ronald J. Zimmer, CABA President & CEO.  “The result was actionable research which determined the clear potentials of connected home technologies along with various strategies that companies can adopt to capitalize on a new wave of services in the age of the emerging smart grid in North America,” said Ron Zimmer, CABA’s president and CEO.

Sponsors of the study included CableLabs, ClimateTalk Alliance, Comcast Communications, Consolidated Edison of New York, Energent Incorporated, fifthplay nv, Hydro One Networks Inc., Hydro Quebec, IBM, IEEE, Intel, Landis+Gyr, Microsoft, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Pella, Philips Lighting, Qualcomm, Samsung Telecommunications America LLC, Southern California Edison, Sykes Assistance Services, Telus, Tridel, TRLabs and the Z-Wave Alliance.